Werrlein Properties, LLC has submitted a proposal for the reuse of 4017 Hamilton Street (former WSSC Building). The presentation is attached to this Forum. 

The application will go through the City's Development Review Process, detailed below. You are invited to provide public comment at any public meeting, within this Forum, or by email to cityclerk@hyattsville.org.

Questions should be directed to the City Planner, Katie Gerbes, at kgerbes@hyattsville.org or (301) 985-5059 OR to Werrlein Properties at info@werrleinproperties.com


Presentation of Proposal

February 5, 2018, City Council Meeting, 3rd Floor Council Chambers

Presentation of Proposal

February 27, 2018, Planning Committee Meeting, 2nd Floor Prangley Room

Discussion of Proposal

April 16, 2018, City Council Meeting, 3rd Floor Council Chambers 

Action on Proposal

May 7, 2018, City Council Meeting, 3rd Floor Council Chambers 

The need to balance environmental impacts, emergency management measures, affordability, and a myriad of other difficult aspects of this project are important. Werrlein Properties won't be able to make every resident happy with their development project, but that shouldn't be the reason that the project is rejected. There will be change to Hyattsville, it isn't easy and will often be uncomfortable.

Despite the potential to be a great location for a new school, it isn't a political or fiscal reality at this time. Turning the building into a 100 unit apartment/condo will only aggravate the feared traffic concerns and makes and even greater change to the character of the neighborhood. While the historic preservation of old building is important, not every building is worth saving.

The issues that Werrlein Properties does need to address to make this property viable are the storm-water management, environmental impact, and flood mitigation concerns. The obvious place to start would be to only build outside of the 500-year flood zone, this would leave most of the upper property for development. To address the environmental impact I suggest utilizing local expertise and implement a better ecological transition from the Magruder Park bog into an expansion of the parks green/wild space on the lower property. Finally, the storm-water management issue must be addressed because the lower lot is one the lowest points in Hyattsville and it is not a matter of if but when there will be flash flooding. Green roofs, community or household cisterns, advanced bio-retention areas, and other methods must be implemented.

There are many dedicated and experienced people in Hyattsville, Werrlein Properties must continue to make use of their skills to help make this a project that is not only acceptable to the community but a proud achievement that makes Hyattsville an even better place to live.

7 Votes Created
mj ballotta at March 06, 2018 at 3:43pm EST

I think Hyattsville needs to take an opportunity to try to "suggest changes" to the planned development by Werrlein Properties. The environmental issues really need to be addressed first and foremost (as Yohannes pointed out). But I also think this is a chance to address some specific housing needs facing our community with no easy solutions in sight: affordable homes, housing for our aging population (smaller homes/one level homes/townhomes), and smaller less expensive houses or cottages, three examples. We have plenty of townhouse developments already in place or in the process of being built. Hyattsville has made a commitment to ensuring the city is age-friendly and has a group developing a plan in conjunction with AARP's age-friendly community program. Housing is a big issue for those wanting to age in Hyattsville -- and for obvious reasons there are not many opportunities to make changes or creation solutions to meet those housing needs or the others I mentioned. It isn't just about aging -- it's about diversity. Not everyone wants to live in a townhouse that costs $400k and up -- or a 4 bedroom+ 4 bath house. One of the best things about Hyattsville is the diversity it offers. We need to keep our housing diverse as well. Why not make a commitment to create some solutions to our current housing problems while we can -- and do it in a way where we all win. This is a problem cities across the country are facing -- we could be a model for other cities who are trying to be affordable, accessible, and diverse. I suggest these same issues be considered for the Landy project as well.